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Clarence John Laughlin: In Memoriam (2)

I know dozens of photographers over fifty years old who never got their due and are beginning to realize that they may never get it. After three or four or five decades of work, they begin to wonder if, in the current public feasting on photography, there are any scraps for them. […]

Clarence John Laughlin: In Memoriam (1)

Sam Wagstaff told Clarence John Laughlin that if he bought something he owned it. He could hang it on his own wall, stick it in a box under his bed, use it as a coaster, scale it out the window — it was his, to do with as he pleased. […]

Ring In the New: 2017

Philip Rivkin’s subsequent scam demonstrated that photographs — some of them, anyhow — have become valuable enough that, like works of visual art in the other media, they can now prove useful for money-laundering purposes, worth smuggling internationally. This represents a step forward for the medium of photography in its relation to the market and the economy — a proud moment, in my opinion, certainly meriting some formal acknowledgment as such. […]

2016: That Was The Year That Was

Two noteworthy facts about this blog’s readership: It’s roughly evenly divided by gender (46 percent female, 54 percent male), slightly over half of whom fall between the ages of 18 and 34. The latter demographic surprises and gratifies me, indicating as it does that the issues I address here, and my approaches to them, prove of interest to many people not of the geezer persuasion. […]

Year-End Ends and Odds

Fashion model Winnie Harlow’s career represents yet another instance of the social importance of disabilities — and, more broadly, differences — going mainstream. When anything beyond the norm goes public via a forthright, positive visual image thereof, from sexual orientation to physical characteristics, tolerance and then acceptance follow close behind. […]